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Pixie

Software for student publishing and creativity.

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Wixie

Online student publishing and creativity platform.

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Frames

Create animations, digital stories, and stop-motion.

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Create web sites, epubs, and presentations.

Professional Learning
Services
Pixie Icon

Pixie

Software for student publishing and creativity.

Wixie Icon

Wixie

Online student publishing and creativity platform.

Frames Icon

Frames

Create animations, digital stories, and stop-motion.

Share Icon

Share

Create web sites, epubs, and presentations.

Tech4Learning Blog
Tech4Learning Blog
Tech4Learning Blog
Tech4Learning Blog

Joseph Machado

Recent Posts

Open-Ended Questioning with Bloom's

Posted by Joseph Machado on Aug 18, 2011 8:37:00 AM

Authentic assessment methods assess, among other things, students' abilities to use higher-order thinking skills to express content knowledge.  Open-ended questioning is a form of authentic assessment, and allows students to use higher-order thinking skills through a variety of content areas.  By their nature, open-ended questions assess writing, conceptual understanding, and thinking skills - especially students' abilities to analyze, to evaluate, and to solve problems.

When I was in the classroom I found using questioning strategies designed for each level of Bloom's Taxonomy to be the most effective.

Lower Order Thinking Skills typically only require rote knowledge and basic comprehension to answer.  In order for students to think critically about information they must master the basics of these skills.  Some questions might be:

How would you identify?
Describe what happens when __________?
How would you clarify the meaning ________?
What can you infer from _________?
What would the result be if __________?
How would you change _________?

Higher Order Thinking Skills typically require students to problem solve, organize and identify patterns, define relationships and create new ideas from known information, and recognize there are various viewpoints.  Some questions might be:

How could you verify __________?
What data was used to evaluate __________?
Discuss the pros and cons of __________?
How can you classify _________ according to ________?
What alternative would you suggest for _________?
What could you invent _________?

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Topics: questioning, understanding, constructivism

Facilitate the Scientific Thinking Process

Posted by Joseph Machado on Aug 15, 2011 3:12:00 PM

Science education, today, focuses more on students than teachers. With the emphasis on the learner, we see that learning is an active process. From this perspective, learning outcomes do not necessarily depend on what the teacher presents. Rather, they are determined and valued based on the types of questions students are asking from the information they encounter and perceive.

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Topics: creativity, understanding, constructivism, teachers, science

Reflect Constructivism

Posted by Joseph Machado on Aug 4, 2011 11:32:00 AM

“Learners are given the freedom to think, to question, to reflect, and to interact with ideas, objects, and others — in other words, to construct meaning.” -Brooks and Brooks.

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Topics: pixie, creativity software, 21st century classroom, understanding, constructivism

Creativity in the Science Classroom

Posted by Joseph Machado on Apr 13, 2011 11:08:00 AM


As Samuel Johnson once said, "Youth is the time of enterprise and hope."

Many teachers find it hard to design imaginative ways of teaching science, especially if science is not their specialty.  I know this was a struggle for me when I was teaching 6th grade.  Science seemed to take a back seat over my love for social studies and language arts.  Today, with the use of productivity and creativity tools, doors are opening for teachers and students to creatively engage with content.

History has shown scientific revolutions are often led by the youngest scientists.

  • In 1953, when James Watson was only 25, he co-wrote one of the most important scientific papers of all time.
  • Marie Curie, the physicist, was just turning 30 when she began investigating radioactivity.
  • Isaac Newton was 23 when he began inventing calculus.
  • Albert Einstein published several of his most important papers at the age of 26.
  • Werner Heisenberg pioneered quantum mechanics in his mid-20s.

According to the National Institute of Health (NIH) most grants today for science and research go to adults during their senior years.  This is somewhat troubling given the stakes of 21st century learning.  Many youth today are not given the opportunity to explore ideas of innovation and creativity in the classroom, therefore inhibiting the advancement of science concepts.  Age does have its benefits in the field, but without the blossoming ideas of youth we may find ourselves further behind than we expect.

Tech4Learning has created a kit for both elementary and secondary science concepts.  Exploring these ideas with your students will aide in fostering creativity, innovation, and a deeper level of understanding with abstract science concepts.
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Topics: creativity, engage, 21st century classroom, technology integration, science

Science and Action Research in Your Classroom

Posted by Joseph Machado on Mar 22, 2011 8:59:00 AM

After reading a white paper put out by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - Scientist-Teacher Partnerships as Professional Development: An Action Research Study, I began to think of the continuous push in our educational system on STEM. What's the most effective method of increasing student awareness in science?

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Topics: creativity software, 21st century classroom, productivity software, professional development, STEM, action research

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