Software
Pixie Icon

Pixie

Software for student publishing and creativity.

Wixie Icon

Wixie

Online student publishing and creativity platform.

Frames Icon

Frames

Create animations, digital stories, and stop-motion.

Share Icon

Create web sites, epubs, and presentations.

Professional Learning
Services
Pixie Icon

Pixie

Software for student publishing and creativity.

Wixie Icon

Wixie

Online student publishing and creativity platform.

Frames Icon

Frames

Create animations, digital stories, and stop-motion.

Share Icon

Share

Create web sites, epubs, and presentations.

Tech4Learning Blog
Tech4Learning Blog
Tech4Learning Blog
Tech4Learning Blog

Creativity in the Science Classroom

Posted by Joseph Machado on Apr 13, 2011 11:08:00 AM

science resized 600
As Samuel Johnson once said, "Youth is the time of enterprise and hope."

Many teachers find it hard to design imaginative ways of teaching science, especially if science is not their specialty.  I know this was a struggle for me when I was teaching 6th grade.  Science seemed to take a back seat over my love for social studies and language arts.  Today, with the use of productivity and creativity tools, doors are opening for teachers and students to creatively engage with content.

History has shown scientific revolutions are often led by the youngest scientists.

  • In 1953, when James Watson was only 25, he co-wrote one of the most important scientific papers of all time.
  • Marie Curie, the physicist, was just turning 30 when she began investigating radioactivity.
  • Isaac Newton was 23 when he began inventing calculus.
  • Albert Einstein published several of his most important papers at the age of 26.
  • Werner Heisenberg pioneered quantum mechanics in his mid-20s.

According to the National Institute of Health (NIH) most grants today for science and research go to adults during their senior years.  This is somewhat troubling given the stakes of 21st century learning.  Many youth today are not given the opportunity to explore ideas of innovation and creativity in the classroom, therefore inhibiting the advancement of science concepts.  Age does have its benefits in the field, but without the blossoming ideas of youth we may find ourselves further behind than we expect.

Tech4Learning has created a kit for both elementary and secondary science concepts.  Exploring these ideas with your students will aide in fostering creativity, innovation, and a deeper level of understanding with abstract science concepts.
science_kit

Topics: creativity, engage, 21st century classroom, technology integration, science

Subscribe via E-mail

Posts by Topic

see all